2016-04-22T20-58-26-01.jpg
LaserLab.png
BAwindows.jpg
Undulator.jpg
1220.png
2016-04-22T20-58-26-01.jpg

Research


SCROLL DOWN

Research


Angus Laser System

Angus Laser System

LUX Beamline

LUX Beamline

Undulators

Undulators

Simulations

Simulations

LaserLab.png

Angus Laser System


Angus Laser System


 

200 TW LAser Operation

In the LUX group we operate the 200 TW, 25 fs laser system ANGUS, running at a repetition rate of 5 Hz. Our ambition is to provide a reliable and reproducible tool for experiments. We therefore attach great importance to automatization, such as auto-alignment procedures, and to continuous data acquisition, that ensure a stable every-day operation and the necessary statistics to identify and remove error sources.

 
LaserLab2.jpg
200tw.png
LaserPannels.jpg
BAwindows.jpg

LUX Beamline


LUX Beamline


Laser Plasma Acceleration

 

We use our high-power laser system as a driver for the plasma acceleration of electrons. From the laser lab, the 5 J pulse can be guided into the 60 m long LUX accelerator tunnel, where it is focused into a millimeter-scale plasma target. In the same spirit as for our laser operation, we aim at high stability and reproducibility, making use of the full 5 Hz laser repetition rate to acquire reliable statistics on the accelerated beams.

 
Focusing Parabola

Focusing Parabola

Plasma Target

Plasma Target

Final Focusing Chamber and Laser Diagnostic

Final Focusing Chamber and Laser Diagnostic

Undulator.jpg

Plasma driven Undulators


Plasma driven Undulators


 

Brilliant Light Sources

We develop and build undulators, specifically designed to be driven by plasma generated electron beams. The new BEAST II undulator is the successor of the world’s first plasma-driven undulator in the soft x-ray regime. With a period of only 5 mm, we aim at reaching the hard x-ray regime within the LUX experiment. In addition, we work on cryogenic undulators for a plasma driven free-electron laser.

 
1220.png

Simulations


Simulations


Particle in Cell Simulations & Development

 

We support our experimental efforts with both theoretical studies and Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations. Here, our emphasize lies on methods to improve the electron beam quality in terms of divergence, emittance and energy spread, as well as diagnostic methods. In order to provide ever more accurate modelling tools and making them available to the research community, we actively contribute to (open-source) PIC code development together with our collaborators from Lawrence Berkeley National Lab.